Loading

eBooks

75 eBooks

      Academic identity is continually being formed and reformed by the institutional, socio-cultural and political contexts within which academic practitioners operate. In Europe the impact of the 2008 economic crisis and its continuing aftermath accounts for many of these changes, but the diverse cultures and histories of different regions are also significant factors, influencing how institutions adapt and resist, and how identities are shaped. Academic Identities in Higher Education highlights the multiple influences acting upon academic practitioners and documents some of the ways in which they are positioning themselves in relation to these often competing pressures.

      At a time when higher education is undergoing huge structural and systemic change there is increasing uncertainty regarding the nature of academic identity. Traditional notions compete with new and emergent ones, which are still in the process of formation and articulation. Academic Identities in Higher Education explores this process of formation and articulation and addresses the question: what does it mean to be an academic in 21st century Europe?

      What does educational policy-making and institutional practice entail in an era of globalization? Global interactions challenge conventional assumptions governing the certainty of geographical boundedness; simplistic notions of citizenship and identity; fixed notions of time, space and movement, and clear distinctions between economic modes of production and consumption.

      Irving Epstein argues that conventional educational institutions and the policies that support them tend to ignore such anxiety by affirming a belief in educational modernism to the exclusion of other possibilities. What is missing in most of these analyses is an appreciation for the role of affect in determining how our encounters with these practices become significant and how our efforts to find meaning in those policies and practices lead to their acceptance or rejection.

      This book is the first application of affect theory to comparative education themes and shows how it can help to form a more robust discussion of the policy-making process and the popular reactions to it. After discussing the key concepts associated with affect theory, he presents a total of six case studies. Three of the cases depict relationships between educational, cultural, and social organizations whose purposes conflict with one another but whose presence is indicative of a loss of faith in the efficacy of public schooling. Three of the cases are illustrative of an even greater systematic rejection of educational institutional aim and purpose.

      Agency and Participation in Childhood and Youth presents new critical engagement in conceptualising the roles of youth agency and participation in education, development and the pursuit of social justice. Theoretically, the book is framed within the paradigm of the capability approach, initially developed by Nobel Laureate, Amartya Sen, and further differentiated by others, including philosopher, Martha Nussbaum. The book unravels the complex relationships between the nature of youth agency and participation, in education, but also in wider political, economic and social arenas, and the potential of young people to expand their freedoms to lead lives they have reason to value. It is thus argued that ethical, sustainable development is contingent on the nature of youth agency and participation in schooling and further afield.

      Bringing together leading international experts researching children’s capabilities, Agency and Participation in Childhood and Youth offers a unique exploration of links between exciting new areas of development in theory, research and practical applications of Sen and Nussbaum’s ideas. The book addresses a significant gap in the literature drawing on empirical data from the United Kingdom, United States, Jordan, Palestine, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Switzerland, New Zealand and beyond, with perspectives presented from both within and outside schools and other formal educational settings.

      Agency and Participation in Childhood and Youth is of particular interest to academics, teaching professionals, undergraduate and postgraduate students of education studies, social policy, youth and development studies.

      Anglican Church School Education explores the contribution of church schools and considers how they might contribute to education in the future to allow for a better standard of understanding of church schools. Drawing together some of the leading writers and thinkers in church school education, this volume is divided into five parts: The Historical Story Current Policy and Philosophy Reflection on Current Practice Instrumental in Shaping the Future Reflections and Recommendations

      This unique collection celebrates past achievements and informs the future engagement of the Church in education.

      An Introduction to the Foundation Phase provides a practical guide to understanding and implementing the Foundation Phase in any early years setting in Wales. The experienced author team discuss and reflect upon a play based approach to learning and the importance of collaboration between various members in any early years settings.

      Students are introduced to key topics including: key theories of influential thinkers within early years education, both past and present; international curricula and perspectives on play and how Welsh curriculum compares; effective classroom practice; observational techniques; methods of assessment and how to be a reflective practitioner.

      Drawing on the results of a tri-national comparative survey of secondary pupils’ attitudes towards Modern Foreign Language Learning (MFLL), this book illustrates both the importance and nature of learner attitudes and the contribution of comparative education to our understanding of educational issues.

      Questions considered include:

      What is the nature of the pupils’ attitudes to the educational dimensions of learning French, German and English in each country?

      To what extent do educational factors influence the pupils’ attitudes to learning each language in each country?

      How similar are the pupils’ attitudes to MFLL within and between the three countries?

      What judgements can be made about the relative significance of educational and socio-cultural influences on pupil attitudes to MFLL in each country?

      Austerity and the Remaking of European Education

      Editor(s):

      Anna Traianou and Ken Jones

      Austerity and the Remaking of European Education offers historically and empirically grounded accounts of national educational formations in Europe, at a specific time in their reshaping through encounters with global policy frameworks, and social and economic developments.

      The authors explore these issues in the context of different pressures that impact on European education systems - from the constraints established by the European Central Bank and the European Commission across Southern Europe, to the 2008 financial crisis and the increased migration.

      The book provides a rigorous theoretical approach to European and national policies, combined with detailed analyses of national educational contexts in England, France, Greece, Hungary and Sweden. These in-depth studies identify major issues of national education policymaking, and explore the complexities of global/national relationships. The economic crisis, the rise of the Left in Greece and of the populist Right in many countries in Europe, questions of cultural and religious diversity, tensions between marketization and inclusion are all brought into focus, offering findings that are of great interest to researchers of education policy, politics and sociology of education alike. In the final section of the book, the authors explore policy alternatives, as embodied in the activities of both governments and non-state actors, such as trade unions and social movements.

      Changing Pedagogy

      Analysing ELT Teachers in China

      Author(s):

      Xin-min Zheng and Chris Davison

      China’s growing economic, military and political stability have, for the first time, started to gain international recognition. As China increasingly opens up to the world, its unique role in the context of economic globalization is becoming more pronounced, which is exemplified by its recent membership of the WTO and Beijing’s successful bid to host the Olympic Games. Unsurprisingly, this has resulted in an explosion in the popularity of English language learning in China, which has, in turn, led to radical reform of the curricula, teaching methods, teacher education and assessment system in China in order to improve standards.

      This fascinating monograph explores the nature of the implemented English language curriculum in China, focussing, in particular, on the pedagogy of secondary school teachers. There follows an insightful analysis into how such teachers, in different situations and with different backgrounds and motivations, make decisions about what and how they teach, and the extent to which they adapt the promoted methods in the their individual teaching environments. The authors then use their findings to propose an innovative and coherent framework, which has far-reaching consequences for pedagogy in China and across the world.

      Children as Decision Makers in Education

      Sharing Experiences Across Cultures

      Editor(s):

      Sue Cox, Caroline Dyer, Anna Robinson-Pant and Michele Schweisfurth

      Since the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, there has been an increasing recognition globally that children need to have more say in their education. Children as Decision Makers in Education looks at how children can actively participate in decision-making. It builds upon previous research into student voice and decision-making, citizenship education in the school curriculum and work with children as researchers. This insightful collection is forward-looking, bringing together cross-cultural experiences and supporting individuals or groups to work collaboratively in the future.

      Citizenship Education in Conflict-Affected Areas examines the practices of learning and teaching citizenship in Lebanon, and explores the implications of the research findings for those working in other sites affected by conflict.

      Bassel Akar analyses rich empirical data, such as semi-structured interviews with teachers and open-ended survey packs with children in classrooms, which reveal conflicts in notions of citizenship and pedagogical approaches. These in-depth explorations of classroom learning and teaching show the hidden and subtle factors that often subvert intentions to promote social cohesion and active citizenship through education. Examining how individual conceptualizations of citizenship influence approaches to learning and teaching and vice versa, the author argues that learning citizenship in schools can undermine aims of democratic participation, dialogue and critical thinking. He concludes and considers why classroom learning of civic education in Lebanon can actually be more harmful than beneficial. Offering new insights for educators and policymakers working beyond the Lebanese context, Citizenship Education in Conflict-Affected Areas is a valuable addition to the research in this growing field.

      Citizenship Education in Japan

      Editor(s):

      Norio Ikeno

      This fascinating volume introduces an international audience to citizenship in Japan. It traces the development of citizenship education from before the Second World War to the present day, demonstrating the role of both the school system and the wider society. The book provides a detailed account anchored in critical analysis of the curriculum, educational resources, pedagogy and assessment.

      Citizenship Education in Japan explores controversial issues through tracing four themes:

      global/intercultural education

      environmental education

      geographical education

      historical education

      It also examines current curricular innovations. Overall, this insightful volume demonstrates that contemporary citizenship education entails not only knowledge about social, historical and geographical affairs, but also participation in society – locally, nationally, and globally.

      Civics and Citizenship Education in Australia provides a comprehensive analysis of teaching and learning in this field in Australian schools, drawing on case study material to demonstrate the current practice in the field. Reflecting on the issues and possibilities raised by the inclusion of civics and citizenship education in the new national Australian curriculum, leading national and international scholars analyse the subject’s theoretical, curricular and pedagogical bases and approaches.

      Placing civics and citizenship education within historical and contemporary contexts, the book critically explores a range of issues concerning the development, organisation and teaching of the subject. These include how the subject might include indigenous, global and Asian perspectives, and how it may help students to engage with issues around sustainability, active citizenship, diversity, religion and values. The final chapters written by scholars from England, the USA, Canada, Hong Kong and Singapore adopt a comparative approach situating Australian civics and citizenship education in the wider international context.

      Continuing Professional Teacher Development in Sub-Saharan Africa explores the prospects that the on-going continuous professional development (CPD) of teachers working in schools offers for meaningful change, particularly towards improving the quality of educational provision for the majority of the continent’s children. By reflecting on teacher professional development efforts and their place in broader education reforms, the book highlights the challenges of teacher CPD in these education contexts – contexts strongly shaped by endemic poverty, under-development and social upheaval. The collection draws together examples of innovation and resilience, and the valuing of teachers as critical role players, enabled and empowered through their on-going development as education professionals.

      The first part of the book contextualises the CPD of teachers in Africa, providing a conceptual framework for a selection of case studies into CPD provision in sub-Saharan countries. Each case study explores a particular area of concern where CPD features as a key strategy towards addressing the challenge, with each chapter including a critical assessment of the nature, form and aim of the particular initiative considered; its conceptualisation and design; as well as critical issues that have or are emerged through the process of implementation. The contributors reflect on the future possibilities the initiatives and their potential value for strengthening and improving education in similar contexts.

      Drawing together a wealth of experience, the volume identifies the policy and research implications for the future of CPD across the continent, providing important lessons that can be integrated into a post-2015 development agenda for Africa.

      School Choice and the forming of citizens for responsible freedom are two of the most hotly debated topics in educational policy. International comparison offers perspective on the effects of alternative policies. This book profiles historically and currently two countries which give strong support to parental choice (The Netherlands and Belgium) and two others that maintain a strong State role in controlling education (Germany and Austria). Charles L. Glenn draws upon Dutch, French, and German sources to contrast how the Dutch and Belgians came over the 19th and 20th centuries to entrust education to civil-society institutions with strong parental choice, while Germany and Austria maintained a predominant State role in education. Glenn illuminates the implications of these policies and the dangers that can arise when the State uses popular schooling to shape popular beliefs and loyalties. This is essential reading for policy specialists concerned with balancing school autonomy and government oversight, and with debates over parental choice of schools.

      Digital Governance of Education explores the multiple ways in which digital technologies are changing the experience of education. With much contemporary education practice either taking place or being documented digitally, a huge amount of data is constantly being collected and analysed to give sophisticated and up-to-date accounts of education practice in contemporary societies. Such ‘datafication’ of education, mediated through technology, gives rise to what the author defines as ‘digital governance’ of education – a transnational assemblage of people, technologies and policies that increasingly affects how national education systems are organized and managed.

      What is the relationship between education, aid and aid agencies?

      Drawing on international research in numerous countries, including Thailand, India, Afghanistan, Lebanon and the UK, the contributors consider the external factors affecting educational provision during and after emergencies.

      Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within the chapter to enable easy navigation, key contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and an annotated list of suggested further reading to support further exploration.

      Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces explores the transformation of the education system in Tunisia following the Jasmine Revolution, the first of a wave of revolutions known as the Arab Spring.

      The authors provide a detailed account of how Tunisia’s robust education system shaped and sparked the conflict as educated youth became disgruntled with their economic conditions. Exploring themes such as radicalization, gender, activism, and social media, the chapters map out the steps occurring during transitions from authoritarian rule to democracy.

      Educational Transitions in Post-Revolutionary Spaces traces the origins of the conflict and revolution in societal issues, including unemployment, inequality, and poverty, and explores how Islam and security influenced the transition. The book not only offers a thorough understanding of the role of youth in the revolution and how it was shaped by Tunisia’s educational system; crucially, it provides a comprehensive understanding of the theoretical and methodological insights needed to study educational transitions in other post-revolutionary contexts.

      Do street children go to school, and if not, why not? What kind of education can be 'meaningful' to young people affected by conflict?

      The contributors explore groups of children and young people who have no, or very limited, educational opportunities in various contexts, including Vietnam, Ukraine, the UK, the USA, and India. They explore a number of educational initiatives that have contributed to improving the lives of disadvantaged children, drawing on the perceptions and experiences of disadvantaged children and young people themselves.

      Each chapter contains contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and an annotated list of suggested reading to support further exploration.

      Education and Gender draws on international research from the USA, the UK, India, Mexico, Sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean, to provide a comprehensive global overview of the relationship between gender and education. Rooting constructions of gender and sexuality in specific geographical contexts, the contributors consider a range of issues. Themes discussed include the gender gap in educational attainment; pedagogical strategies; stereotyping in curricula; and education policy. Drawing on best practices worldwide, the contributors identify the current gaps and propose solutions to promote gender-just, equitable and pluralistic societies. Each chapter includes key questions to encourage active engagement with the subject and a list of further reading to support taking the exploration further.

      Education and HIV/AIDS draws together contributors with expertise in HIV/AIDS and education working around the world, including Sub-Saharan Africa, Southeast Asia, Europe, the USA and the Caribbean, from a variety of perspectives. Contributors explore the changing nature of education in light of this epidemic, as well as the impact of public health issues on educational institutions, in a range of different contexts. Within each chapter, the contributors pull apart a variety of relationships HIV/AIDS has with education; some provide a comparative analysis of global responses and international politics, others use small case studies to explore how local culture and tradition impacts these issues.

      Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within each chapter to enable easy navigation, key contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and references to seminal texts and cutting-edge research to prompt further reading and discussion.

      Education and Internally Displaced Persons

      Education as Humanitarian Response

      Editor(s):

      Christine Smith Ellison and Alan Smith

      What are the barriers to education for internally displaced persons? How can these be overcome? Drawing on research from a diverse set of countries, including the the USA, Somalia, Colombia, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the contributors consider the relationship between education and internally displaced persons. These case studies raise fundamental questions regarding the barriers to education and some unexpected benefits for displaced children. The dynamics that impact access and quality of education for internally displaced people are examined and the role education can play in rebuilding societies and strengthening peace building processes is considered.Each case study brings to light a different aspect of displacement including various causes: current legal protection and its implications for government action and practical responses; challenges arising from country contexts related to the scale and duration of displacement; and the role of education in meeting the needs of returnees.

      The contributors explore the experience of learners from minority groups and the education policy response of authorities, drawing on the international research in the USA, Finland, Rwanda, India, South Africa, Hungary, China and the UK. They explore the purpose of education for minority groups and in particular the place of human, social and identity capital in policy and practice.

      Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within each chapter to enable easy navigation, key contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and an annotated list of suggested reading to support further exploration.

      What is the relationship between education and natural disasters? Can education play a role in ameliorating and mitigating them, preparing people in how to respond, and even helping to prevent them? If so, how?

      Drawing on research carried out in a number of different countries, including Australia, China, India, Japan, the UK and the USA, the contributors consider the role of education in relation to natural disasters. The case studies expand conceptual and empirical understandings of the understudied relationship between education and natural disasters, uncover the potential and the limitations of education for mitigating, responding to, and potentially preventing, natural disasters. The contributors also consider the extent to which so-called natural disasters, such as mudslides caused by deforestation and flooding areas built on known flood plains, are linked to human behaviour and how education can impact on these.

      Education and NGOs

      Editor(s):

      Lorraine Pe Symaco

      Education and NGOs discusses the role of sectors outside the mainstream in relation to improving access to education, with particular focus on the underprivileged. International case study examples offer insights into the work of non-governmental organizations, which play a crucial role in UNESCO’s global Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) effort, by providing alternative forms of education and improving educational access.

      Including a discussion of the work of organizations such as Africa Educational Trust, Kids Company, FIDAL Foundation and many others, the volume explores the role of NGOs in the UK, the USA, India, Nepal, the Gaza Strip, Ecuador, Philippines and South Africa. Each chapter contains contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and an annotated list of suggested reading to support further exploration.

      What is the relationship between education and reconciliation initiatives? Who encourages and enacts it and who discourages and detracts from it? Do reconciliatory educational practices offer any insight into the nature of reconciliation as a process? Drawing on international research in numerous countries, including Bosnia Herzegovina, Rwanda, South Africa, Jordan, Peru and the USA, the contributors consider, conceptually and empirically, the role of education in reconciling societies, groups and individuals divided by conflict. These case studies expand conceptual and empirical understandings of the understudied relationship between education and reconciliation and its potential for addressing and repairing the divisions of conflict. Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within the chapter to enable easy navigation, key relevant and contemporary questions to encourage you to actively engage with the material and an annotated list of suggested further reading to support you to take your exploration further. A companion websitesupports the text and provides updates and additional resources.

      This is an engaging discussion about the functions of education, drawing on a range of educational situations. “Education as a Global Concern” introduces the issues covered by this exciting new series, “Education as a Humanitarian Response”. Colin Brock challenges the existing functions of education as widely and conventionally perceived, and promotes the notion of education as a humanitarian response as the prime function. He will examine the educational situations of a range of human groups that are marginalized or excluded from mainstream provision and will also consider the idea that ‘humane’ means ‘appropriate’. This series presents an authoritative, coherent and focused collection of texts to introduce and promote the notion of education as a humanitarian response as a prime function of educational activity. The series takes a holistic interpretation of education, dealing not only with formal schooling and other systemic provisions in the mainstream, but rather with educational reality-teaching and learning in whatever form it comes at any age.

      Education in Indigenous, Nomadic and Travelling Communities provides a thorough examination of up-to-date case studies of educational provision to travelling communities and indigenous people in their homeland or in host countries. Education is usually under-utilised during phases of transition. In many instances, indigenous groups and travelling people, including nomads, do not have educational opportunities equal to that of their settled counterpart-citizens of their country resulting in early school leaving, high school drop-out rates, low school attendance and low success rates resulting in such groups beginning their working life at an early age and finding difficulty penetrating the formal employment arena.

      In this volume international researchers analyse the internal and external factors affecting educational provision to travelling, nomadic and indigenous groups. Global case studies including the Roma people in Europe; indigenous groups in Malaysia; the nomadic tribes of Afghanistan as well as the Amazonian Indians of Latin America enable a comparative examination of the issues.

      Education, Poverty, Malnutrition and Famine provides an overview of education response – what it is and how it can be improved in relation to one of the more persistent issues globally. Poverty, famine and/or malnutrition exist in variant degrees among developing and developed nations and the issue figures prominently in international development. This book provides a global overview of education and such issues through case study samples of countries within various regions and offers insights and proposes solutions on how educational response can help alleviate this challenge.

      Each chapter contains contemporary questions to encourage active engagement with the material and an annotated list of suggested reading to support further exploration.

      What is the relationship between education and those seeking asylum or refuge? What is the impact of education being marginalized during conflict situations? Drawing on international research in numerous countries, including Thailand, North Korea, Lebenon, Africa, the USA and the UK, the contributors consider, conceptually and empirically, the provision of education to refugees and asylum seekers in their homeland or in host countries, analyzing the internal and external factors affecting educational provision during and after emergencies. Each chapter contains a summary of the key points and issues within the chapter to enable easy navigation, key contemporary questions to encourage you to actively engage with the material and an annotated list of suggested further reading to support you to take your exploration further. A companion website supports the text and provides updates and additional resources.

      Engaging with Linguistic Diversity describes an innovative and highly successful approach to inclusive plurilingual education at primary level. The approach was developed by Scoil Bhríde (Cailíní), Blanchardstown, as a way of converting extreme linguistic diversity – more than 50 home languages in a school of 320 pupils – into educational capital. The central feature of the approach is the inclusion of home languages in classroom communication.

      After describing the national context, the book traces the development of Scoil Bhríde’s approach and explores in detail its impact on classroom discourse, pupils’ plurilingual literacy development, and their capacity for autonomous learning. The authors illustrate their arguments with a wealth of practical evidence drawn from a variety of sources; pupils’ and teachers’ voices are especially prominent. The concluding chapter considers issues of sustainability and replication and the implications of the approach for teacher education.

      The book refers to a wide range of relevant research findings and theories, including translanguaging, plurilingual and intercultural education, language awareness and language learner autonomy. It is essential reading for researchers and policy-makers in the field of linguistically inclusive education.

      How do we prepare young people to understand the complex problems confronting our society and their place as citizens in shaping solutions?

      Until 1997, the contribution of schools to these challenges was ad hoc and uncoordinated, but with the introduction of citizenship education into the National Curriculum in England a new political project began. Between 2002 and 2012, England has become a leading player in the debate about how to induct young people into democracy. Jerome explores the connections between the values promoted by the government and the forms of citizenship promoted through the National Curriculum and considers:

      What did the politicians want the policy to achieve?

      What kinds of citizens were teachers trying to create?

      What kind of citizens do the young people feel that they have become?

      To answer these questions this book considers a range of evidence from large scale national and international research projects to single school case studies, conducted with student co-researchers. The study illustrates the complexity of policy making and reveals the gap between curriculum policy and implementation.

      What drives school leaders?

      What do they do on a day to day basis?

      What helps or constrains their decision-making?

      What keeps them focused amidst challenges?

      Rather than applying theory to practice, Exploring School Leadership in England and the Caribbean draws on how school leaders practice and experience their own leadership. Paul Miller draws on case studies from Jamaica and England to explore what it means to be a school leader and explores a wide-range of issues, including accountability, performativity, inclusion and multiculturalism, technology, staffing and resourcing decisions.

      While no two school leaders will have identical experiences as a school leader, Paul Miller draws on the first-hand accounts of school leaders to show that regardless of school size, type and location there are a number of common experiences and themes. Miller acknowledges that the practice of school leadership is occurring in an uncertain economic environment, buoyed by a fast paced policy context where by targets linked to national economic development are the new normal. He concludes that school leadership is a continuous balancing act driven by and experienced through an ”Economic-motor model„ of schooling – which he proposes.

      Forward with Classics

      Classical Languages in Schools and Communities

      Editor(s):

      Arlene Holmes-Henderson, Steven Hunt and Mai Musié

      Despite their removal from England’s National Curriculum in 1988, and claims of elitism, Latin and Greek are increasingly re-entering the ‘mainstream’ educational arena. Since 2012, there have been more students in state-maintained schools in England studying classical subjects than in independent schools, and the number of schools offering Classics continues to rise in the state-maintained sector. The teaching and learning of Latin and Greek is not, however, confined to the classroom: community-based learning for adults and children is facilitated in newly established regional Classics hubs in evenings and at weekends, in universities as part of outreach, and even in parks and in prisons.

      This book investigates the motivations of teachers and learners behind the rise of Classics in the classroom and in communities, and explores ways in which knowledge of classical languages is considered valuable for diverse learners in the 21st century. The role of classical languages within the English educational policy landscape is examined, as new possibilities exist for introducing Latin and Greek into school curricula. The state of Classics education internationally is also investigated, with case studies presenting the status quo in policy and practice from Australasia, North America, the rest of Europe and worldwide. The priorities for the future of Classics education in these diverse locations are compared and contrasted by the editors, who conjecture what strategies are conducive to success.

      From Technicians to Teachers provides theoretical and practical reasons for suggesting that widespread, international curriculum reform of the post-1990 period need not deprofessionalise teaching. The widely held deprofessionalisation thesis is both compelling and fatalistic, leading to a despairing sense that teachers are either no more than technicians, or that they can be reprofessionalised through definitions of ‘effective teachers’ promoted by the reforms. However, there are many teachers who do not see their work in either of these ways.

      The book is structured around an in-depth case study detailing the implementation of The New Zealand Curriculum in that nation - one of the best international examples of neoliberal reform. Benade argues that curriculum policy can and should be analysed critically, while pointing out the dangers for ethical teachers that can exist in national or state curricula.

      Energising and inspiring, this book reminds teachers and teacher educators that although they work in a globalised context, their own role is fundamental and has a profoundly ethical basis, despite the negative impacts of three decades of education reform.

      While scholarship on the education of youth behind bars has largely focused on boys, more than one in three youth arrests in the United States is female. Girls Behind Bars sets out to address this imbalance.

      First, the book offers autobiographies, life-stories, and counter-stories in order to counter simplistic generalizations and empirical prescriptions. Next, the study provides the educational community with critical perspectives that examine empiricist epistemologies and positivist methodologies that label certain groups of girls as delinquent and mark them for punitive and corrective treatment behind bars. Third, the book opens up the discussion on girls' gender, desire, and sexuality by offering a language for these issues absent in educational discourse. Finally, the book supports calls for educators and practitioners in their desire to envision and create transformative spaces that enable young girls behind bars to reclaim their education.

      Including a foreword by William Ayers and Bernadine Dohrn, this important and powerful book gives voice to a neglected, silenced, and misrepresented population – young girls behind bars.

      Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism

      Comparative Perspectives

      Author(s):

      Massimiliano Tarozzi and Carlos Alberto Torres

      The notion of global citizenship education (GCE) has emerged in the international education discourse in the context of the United Nations Education First Initiative that cites developing global citizens as one of its goals. In this book, the authors argue that GCE offers a new educational perspective for making sense of the existing dilemmas of multiculturalism and national citizenship deficits in diverse societies, taking into account equality, human rights and social justice.

      The authors explore how teaching and research may be implemented relating to the notion of global citizenship and discuss the intersections between the framework of GCE and multiculturalism. They address the three main topics which affect education in multicultural societies and in a globalized world, and which represent unsolved dilemmas: the issue of diversity in relation to creating citizens, the issue of equality and social justice in democratic societies, and the tension between the global and the local in a globalized world.

      Through a comparative study of the two prevailing approaches – intercultural education within the European Union and multicultural education in the United States – the authors seek what can be learned from each model. Global Citizenship Education and the Crises of Multiculturalism offers not only a unifying theoretical framework but also a set of policy recommendations aiming to link the two approaches.

      Universities all over the world are increasingly recognising the challenges of globalization and the pressures towards internationalization. This collection draws together a wealth of international experience to explore the emerging patterns of strategy and practice in internationalizing Higher Education.

      Governance of Educational Trajectories in Europe

      Pathways, Policy and Practice

      Editor(s):

      Andreas Walther, Marcelo Parreira do Amaral, Morena Cuconato and Roger Dale

      Drawing on findings from a large EU-funded research project that took place over three years, this book analyses educational trajectories of young people in eight European countries: Finland, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovenia and the United Kingdom.

      Contributors explore interactions between structural and institutional contexts of educational trajectories, the individual meaning attached to education and the strategies adopted by young people to cope with its demands. The book also analyses the decision-making processes of individual students, placing them firmly within the social contexts of their families, local schools, national education systems and welfare states, as well as transnational policy contexts.

      In considering educational disadvantage, the book is based on primary, cross-national research with systematic analysis of the different themes addressed. As every chapters is co-authored by two or three researchers, each based in a different country, the book goes beyond the usual country-based chapter design to provide an enriched insight into both comparative theory and research methods.

      The financial crisis of 2007/2008 prompted governments across Europe to adopt austerity measures aimed at the reduction of their escalating budget deficits. Higher Education in Austerity Europe explores how the resulting cuts in public expenditure - together with the increasing reliance on the privatisation of services - have impacted on higher education directly through the reduction of public sector provision and indirectly as a result of the social and political consequences of that reduction. Moreover, it explores how the effects of these economic policies have differed markedly across the national regions of Europe, with the result that inequality has increased significantly both within and between national regions, and this, in turn, has led to social and political dislocation within and across communities.

      It is only by viewing higher education within this broader context that we can begin to understand the full implications of the austerity measures introduced over the last ten years. Jon Nixon draws together leading scholars to delve into the complexity of impact and response generated by these measures. Part 1 focuses on cross-European perspectives; Part 2 on the impact of austerity measures within national systems; and Part 3 on new perspectives and possibilities. The volume also includes considered responses from ‘outsider’ academics located in Asia, Australia and the USA, providing an additional dimension to the analysis. As well as analysing the full impact of austerity measures across some of the worst hit national regions of Europe, the contributors also identify openings and possibilities for renewal.

      Geraldlynn is a lively, astute 14-year-old. Her family, displaced by Hurricane Katrina, returns home to find a radically altered public education system. Geraldlynn’s parents hope their daughter’s new school will prepare her for college—but the teenager has ideals and ambitions of her own.

      Aidan is a fresh-faced Harvard grad drawn to New Orleans by the possibility of bringing change to a flood-ravaged city. He teaches at an ambitious charter school with a group of newcomers determined to show the world they can use science, data, and hard work to build a model school.

      Mary Laurie is a veteran educator who becomes principal of one of the first public high schools to reopen after Katrina. Laurie and her staff find they must fight each day not only to educate the city’s teenagers, but to keep the Walker community safe and whole.

      In this powerful narrative non-fiction debut, the lives of these three characters provide readers with a vivid and sobering portrait of education in twenty-first-century America. Hope Against Hope works in the same tradition as Random Family and There Are No Children Here to capture the challenges of growing up and learning in a troubled world.

      Identity and Pedagogy in Higher Education

      International Comparisons

      Author(s):

      Kalwant Bhopal and Patrick Alan Danaher

      Kalwant Bhopal and Patrick Danaher examine ‘race’, identity and gender within education and explore the difficulties of relating these concepts to the experience of students in higher education. In drawing together the experience of local and international students in the UK and in Australia, they examine the ways identities are understood and conceptualized within higher education in local contexts and on a global level. They consider the complexity of ‘race’, gender and identity in relation to education within the context that education continues to be dominated by predominantly white, middle class values and perspectives.

      Identity and Pedagogy in Higher Education examines the extent to which education as a vehicle for change in the light of the controversial debates surrounding race and gender inequalities.

      Trainees’ voices, beliefs and experiences as learners, shaped by the tension and dialogue between internal and external theories of teaching and learning, inevitably penetrate the Initial English Language Teacher Education (IELTE) curriculum. Scrutinising these beliefs and experiences, Initial English Language Teacher Education provides readers with vivid and informed accounts of IELTE from around the world.

      Approaching IELTE from a sociocultural perspective, the authors analyse future teachers’ trajectories and educational histories in order to understand their experiences as learners, unpack internal beliefs, and problematise the relationships between such beliefs with theories and research in the field. Exploring accounts from a number of under-researched contexts, Initial English Language Teacher Education investigates and analyses perspectives from Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Kenya, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and Uruguay. Through the eyes of future teachers, the chapters address issues such as: trainee motivation, tensions between theory and practice, role of feedback, teacher development and identity, critical pedagogies, online teacher education and intercultural awareness.

      Illuminating thus far understudied international relations in global higher education, the book titled Internationalization of Higher Education for Development illustrates how the Brazilian government, under the presidency of Luis Inácio Lula da Silva (2003-2010), legitimized Africa-Brazil relations often referring to the presumably shared history of transatlantic slavery as the condition for solidarity cooperation and international integration. Ress reveals how this notion of history produces a vision of Brazil as a multicultural nation able to redress longstanding racialized inequalities while casting ‘Africa’ as the continent that remains forever in the past. She explores how this ambiguous notion was translated into curricula and classroom practices, and, in particular how it shaped international students’ experiences at a newly-created university in the Northeast of Brazil. Ress demonstrates how the historicized framing in conjunction with the powerfully racialized class structures that characterize Brazilian society, the challenging material conditions surrounding the university, and the future aspirations of students created an environment that made solidarity an economic necessity while repeating the century-old colonial gesture of othering ‘Africa’ in new yet all too familiar ways – reworking and reemploying the idea of race in the name of Brazil’s progress and development.

      This book showcases in an innovative way the challenges and opportunities of building international relations in postcolonial education contexts. A much-needed advances over current scholarship analysing race, blackness, and solidarity, it offers a timely contribution to postfoundational and postcolonial studies in comparative and international education.

      The University of International Integration of African-Brazilian Lusophony (UNILAB) provides an interesting case study for the implementation of higher education within a South-South development paradigm, which seeks to strengthen Africa-Brazil relations and Brazil’s position as a global player while addressing racial disparity in Brazilian higher education and underdevelopment in the rural interior. Envisioned as a project of South-South solidarity, extensive fieldwork revealed a much more ambiguous set of relations. With its over-privileging of an abolitionist narrative, UNILAB fails to acknowledge the significance of Portuguese colonialism as well as anti-colonial independence movements in configuring a shared Lusophone history, while disavowing the diversity of experiences of international students. International professors and students sometimes expressed discomfort with being made to represent a Brazil-centered understanding of history. They are worried that affirmative action policies would compromise South-South cooperation. Although the university’s core humanistic curriculum followed a postcolonial, non-Eurocentric logic, classroom observations often revealed Brazil-centered emancipation narratives that posited Africa as a simplified other, racializing Africa and international students in the name of Brazilian progress. Rather than taking race for granted, this study unpacks the concepts as an object of knowledge by drawing upon insights from critical black studies. The study observes when, where, and how the idea of race emerges, and what functions it performs as a conceptual and political category while problematizing the Enlightenment binary of reason and unreason inscribed into human flesh through colonial technologies of dehumanization and expropriation. Calling for a conscious yet non-essentializing conceptualization of race in education research and theory, the study moves beyond race as marker of difference as either cultural or biological classification by showing multiple meanings it takes on as a frame of reference for students and professors to make sense of the university, as a political technology, and as a subject position that defies singular interpretations as it travels across times and spaces with international student mobility offering yet another moment of reinterpretation.

      International Perspectives on Education

      Editor(s):

      Chau Meng Huat and Trevor Kerry

      International Perspectives on Education draws on the knowledge and experience of a distinguished team of international educationists, including Howard Gardner and Kristján Kristjánsson. Each chapter can be accessed as a resource on a specific topic, but the chapters are also grouped into three sections to provide an invaluable source of thinking and knowledge from leading thinkers and practitioners in their fields: Perspectives on Education; Supporting the Learning Process; and Teachers and Professional Development.

      Trevor Kerry draws together contributions from leading academics in the field based in Europe, Canada and Australia to examine key themes in higher education, including:

      • academic freedom

      • leadership and management

      • the nature of learning and teaching

      • ethical behaviour

      • curriculum innovation

      • attitudes to globalization and internationalization

      The contributors explore what might constitute effective higher education provision, drawing on innovative practice from around the world and encouraging higher education practitioners to become more analytical and critical about their institutions, about their own roles, and about the ways in which they and their work serve their client-base. In so doing the book confronts the contextual conflicts that arise from political, social and fiscal agendas for higher education.

      Interventions in Education Systems

      Reform and Development

      Author(s):

      David Scott, Charles Posner, Christopher Martin and Elsa Guzman

      Interventions in Education Systems draws on research conducted in England, Mexico, Singapore and Finland to illuminate reform processes to education systems in a range of contexts, to develop a better understanding of intervention processes and to promote the development of more sophisticated models for reforming education systems. The authors compare policy implementations and interventions in countries with different socio-economic profiles and different levels of development, highlighting how these processes in practice all too frequently are side-tracked and distorted, often unintentionally, by political, economic and social forces.

      Islam in the School Curriculum explores the conceptualisation of school-based Islam on two levels: as a symbolic category in English religious education as a consequence of policy shifts, and as pedagogic discourse at the local community level in state and Muslim schools. Using recontextualisation theory, the author examines the relations between educational governance, social interests and cultural epistemology as they pertain specifically to symbolic constructs.

      In the aftermath of September 11 2001, the teaching of Islam has assumed geopolitical significance, coming under close scrutiny internationally. Much of this attention has been directed at madrasas in Muslim countries, yet Islam in schooling contexts in the West has remained a blind-spot. In the UK, heightened anxieties about 'home-grown' terrorists point to the need for a better understanding of Islam in both state and faith schools.

      Shiraz Thobani explores the role played by national and local policies and pedagogic practices in the production of school-based Islam in a secular, liberal context and makes an important contribution to the sociology of the curriculum and the study of religious education.

      Today, community colleges enroll 40% of all undergraduates in the United States. In the years ahead, these institutions are expected to serve an even larger share of this student population. However, faced with increasing government pressure to significantly improve student completion rates, many community colleges will be forced to reconsider their traditional commitment to expand educational opportunity. Community colleges, therefore, are at a crossroads. Should they focus on improving student completion rates and divert resources from student recruitment programs? Should they improve completion rates by closing developmental studies programs and limiting enrollment to college-ready students? Or, can community colleges simultaneously expand educational opportunity and improve student completion?

      In John Dewey and the Future of Community College Education, Cliff Harbour argues that before these questions can be answered, community colleges must articulate the values and priorities that will guide them in the future. Harbour proposes that leaders across the institution come together and adopt a new democracy-based normative vision grounded in the writings of John Dewey, which would call upon colleges to do much more than improve completion rates and expand educational opportunity. It would look beyond the national economic measures that dominate higher education policy debates today and would prioritize individual student growth and the development of democratic communities. Harbour argues that this, in turn, would help community colleges contribute to the vital work of reconstructing American democracy.

      John Dewey and the Future of Community College Education is essential reading for all community college advocates interested in taking a more active role in developing the community college of the future.

      Kindergarten Narratives on Froebelian Education

      Transnational Investigations

      Editor(s):

      Helen May, Kristen Nawrotzki and Larry Prochner

      Kindergarten Narratives on Froebelian Education showcases the latest scholarship and historical understandings concerning the casting of the kindergarten idea abroad: across cultures, continents and centuries.

      Each chapter reveals previously unknown narratives of intrepid endeavour, political pragmatism and pedagogical innovation that collectively provide insight into the transformation of Froebel’s ideas on early education into a global phenomenon. Across global contexts, each chapter presents a case study of the ideas scattering abroad, illustrative of the movement of ideas, curricula and pedagogical change; in effect taking the kindergarten beyond the geographies and pedagogies of its German beginnings and borders. Chapters draw on historical examples of Froebelian education from The Netherlands, New Zealand, Japan, Sweden, the UK and the USA.

      In the journal History of Education in 2006, Froebelian history scholar Professor Kevin J. Brehony (1948-2013) lamented the ‘relative neglect’ of the history of early years education at the same time there was a heightened global social and political interest in educating the young child. In this book, an international team of contributors respond to Brehony's suggestion that historical perspectives can play a role in current debates and suggest ways historical narratives might inform policies and practices in twenty-first century early childhood education, care settings and contexts. Reconnecting past lessons and insights with present and future concerns for early education, young children and their place in society, this important collection also includes an historical timeline charting the spread of Froebelian education ideas and kindergartens across the world.

      The notion of 'place' is a powerful one: the place where we are from; the place where we live; the place where we would like to be. It raises issues of identity and belonging (or lack of it), and about roots and connections (or lack of them). In a world that is more uncertain, more liquid, less known, place matters. This engaging and accessible book is the first of its kind to look at the role of place in schools and in the lives of young people today. Drawing on original research from the US, UK and South Africa, Kathryn Riley poses some tough questions to the practitioners who lead our schools, and to the politicians who decide the fate of our schools: ·Can schools create a space for young people to be safe and confident in who they are? ·Can they help them find their place in the world and understand how to shape it?

      What do teachers learn ‘on the job’? And how, if at all, do they learn from ‘experience’?

      Leading researchers from the UK, Europe, the USA and Canada offer international, research-based perspectives on a central problem in policy-making and professional practice – the role that experience plays in learning to teach in schools. Experience is often weakly conceptualized in both policy and research, sometimes simply used as a proxy for ‘time’, in weeks and years, spent in a school classroom. The conceptualization of experience in a range of educational research traditions lies at the heart of this book, exemplified in a variety of empirical and theoretical studies. Distinctive perspectives to inform these studies include sociocultural psychology, the philosophy of education, school effectiveness, the sociology of education, critical pedagogy, activism and action research. However, no one theoretical perspective can claim privileged insight into what and how teachers learn from experience; rather, this is a matter for a truly educational investigation, one that is both close to practice and seeks to develop theory.

      At a time when policy-makers in many countries seek to make teacher education an entirely school-based activity, Learning Teaching from Experience offers an essential examination of the evidence-base, the traditions of inquiry – and the limits of those inquiries.

      Based on a hundred interviews with some of the key stakeholders in university admissions, and statistics from both primary and secondary sources, this book explains the values, processes and practices that judge some individuals as worthy of getting an education at elite universities and deny admission to other applicants.

      By juxtaposing the UK and US systems the book invites readers from both sides of the Atlantic to see the familiar as strange and to reflect on the underlying values behind the selection of students. It illustrates how particular discussions of meritocracy affect individuals and relate to the history and social climate of each nation.

      While access to higher education has increased globally, student retention has become a major challenge. This book analyses various aspects of the learning pathways of black students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds at a relatively elite, English-medium, historically white South African university. The students are part of a generation of young black people who have grown up in the new South Africa and are gaining access to higher education in unprecedented numbers. Based on two longitudinal case studies, Negotiating Learning and Identity in Higher Education makes a contribution to the debates about how to facilitate access and graduation of working-class students. The longitudinal perspective enabled the students participating in the research to reflect on their transition to university and the stumbling blocks they encountered in their senior years. The contributors show that the school-to-university transition is not linear or universal. Students had to negotiate multiple transitions at various times and both resist and absorb institutional, disciplinary and home discourses.

      The book describes and analyses the students' ambivalence as they straddle often conflicting discourses within their disciplines; within the institution; between home and the institution; and as they occupy multiple subject positions that are related to the boundaries of place and time. Each chapter also describes the ways in which the institution supports and/or hinders students' progress, explores the implications of its findings for models of support and addresses the issue of what constitutes meaningful access to institutional and disciplinary discourses

      New primary leaders face significant challenges worldwide and this book brings together the range of those experiences and challenges for the first time. It includes interviews with primary school leaders in the early years of leadership in 12 different countries. Each chapter begins with an introduction to the principal and the local context before the principal’s own description of her or his experience as a new leader. The leaders discuss how they prepared for principalship, their experiences after taking up the post, the extent to which the job meets with their expectations and their hopes and fears for the future. The final chapter provides a comparative overview, exploring new principals’ perceptions of key influences on schools and their communities, their reactions to the multiple, heightened and often-conflicting expectations, pressures and challenges they encounter and the implications for principal preparation internationally. The voices of principals from around the world provide a vivid and authentic picture of new school leaders in different contexts at the beginning of the 21st century.

      Peace Education

      International Perspectives

      Editor(s):

      Monisha Bajaj and Maria Hantzopoulos

      Bringing together the voices of scholars and practitioners on challenges and possibilities of implementing peace education in diverse global sites, this book addresses key questions for students seeking to deepen their understanding of the field. The book not only highlights ground-breaking and rich qualitative studies from around the globe, but also analyses the limits and possibilities of peace education in diverse contexts of conflict and post-conflict societies. Contributing authors address how educators and learners can make meaning of international peace education efforts, how various forms of peace and violence interact in and around schools, and how the field of peace education has evolved and grown over the past four decades.

      The idea of fragmentation has transformed the living, convivial pursuit of knowledge into something akin to an industrial assembly line. Schooling in North America is inherently based on this idea, working against the spirit of pedagogy and the very nature of knowledge itself. Fragmentation has lead to practices that are easily recognizable in schools such as surveillance, colonization, leveling, standardization, normalization and even oppression: the logic of fragmentation has lead to the breaking apart of the living disciplines of knowledge entrusted to teachers and students in the classroom.

      In this profound and challenging book, David Jardine explores some of the historical and philosophical ancestries of the logic of fragmentation and then lays out how the logic of fragmentation is being interrupted by progressive contemporary thinking about the nature of knowledge and its pursuit. Jardine uses real classroom examples to show how inspiring teachers and students have stepped out from the normal rigidity of the school system to pursue a pedagogy left in peace.

      Policy, Belief and Practice in the Secondary English Classroom

      A Case-Study Approach from Canada, England and Scotland

      Author(s):

      Bethan Marshall, Simon Gibbons, Louise Hayward and Ernest Spencer

      Studies of comparative classroom practice in the teaching of secondary English are limited, especially when it comes to exploration of the day-to-day practice of English teachers in the secondary classroom. This book presents a case study analysis of secondary classroom practice in three countries: Canada, England and Scotland. Each country has had different degrees of state involvement within the secondary English curriculum over the last twenty years. England has had the highest degree of state involvement in that it has had several statutory national curricula and a variety of assessment regimes. Scotland has had a non- statutory curriculum and no national tests and Canada has had no national curriculum at all, with education being determined at province level, and each province varying its policies.

      The research adopts a case study approach involving both classroom observation and interviews with teachers. Through this, the authors explore the impact of state involvement on the reality of what happens in secondary English classrooms. The book invites readers to consider the applicability of the findings to their own contexts, to examine their own practice in the light of this and to consider the nature of the relationships between policy, personal belief and practice in the teaching of English.

      Based on comparative adult education statistics offered by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Survey of Adult Skills (PIAAC) and country case studies, this book analyses the policies and structures that foster adult learning. It examines a variety of forms of adult learning, ranging from initial forms of post-compulsory education, such as upper secondary tracks and tertiary education, to firm training, compensatory adult education and learning for civic and leisure oriented purposes.

      Throughout the book, adult learning systems are directly linked to a variety of structural and public policy frameworks using a comparative welfare state approach. Themes such as pathways to learning and transition systems, participation patterns in higher education and participation patterns in other organized forms of adult learning are covered. The countries discussed are the UK, the USA, Korea, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Germany and the Netherlands.

      Situated at the intersection between scholarship and policy and using a mixed-methods approach, this title contributes fundamental insights into the further study of policies and structures related to alternative post-compulsory learning pathways.

      In recent times, there has been intense global interest on and scrutiny of Islamic education. In reforming Islamic schools, what are the key actions initiated and are they contested or negotiated by and among Muslims?

      This edited collection brings together leading scholars to explore current reforms in Islamic schools. Drawing together international case studies, Reforms in Islamic Education critically discusses the reforms, considering the motivations for them, nature of them and perceptions and experiences of people affected by them. The contributors also explore the tensions, resistance, contestations and negotiations between Muslims and non-Muslims, and among Muslims, in relation to the reforms.

      Highlighting the need to understand and critique reforms in Islamic schools within broad historical, political and socio-cultural contexts, this book is a valuable resource for academics, policymakers and educators.

      Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence offers an example of a different approach to national curriculum development. It combines what are claimed to be the best features of top-down and bottom-up approaches to curriculum development, and provides an indication of the broad qualities that school education should promote rather than a detailed description of curriculum content. Advocates of the approach argue that it provides central guidance for schools and maintains national standards whilst at the same time allowing schools and teachers the flexibility to take account of local needs when designing programmes of education. Reinventing the Curriculum uses Scotland's Curriculum for Excellence as a rich case study, analyzing the strengths and weaknesses of this approach to curriculum design and development, and exploring the implications for curriculum planning and development around the world.

      El Chavo del Ocho is one of the most influential pieces of popular culture to have hit Latin America in the last 50 years, having, at the peak of its popularity in the mid-1970s, reached an approximate audience of 350 million across the Americas. It is also a rare example of a cultural product that has travelled through Latin America, leaving a lasting impact for several decades.

      Resonances of El Chavo del Ocho in Latin American Childhood, Schooling, and Societies analyses the phenomenon of El Chavo, and its images of schooling and childhood, Latin American-ness, class and experience. With contributions from scholars emerging from or based in countries including Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Puerto Rico, Argentina, Venezuela, Colombia and the US, the book combines reflections from a variety of international perspectives without attempting to compare or reach consensus on any ultimate meaning(s) of the work. The book explores themes such as images of schooling and childhood, romantization of poverty, the prevalence of non-traditional families and the bordering cynicism towards the economic structures and inequalities which, some argue, make the show transgressive and quite uniquely Latin American. Investigating the connection between visual culture studies and transcultural curriculum studies, this innovative title provides scholars with original new insights into conceptualizing childhood, schooling and society in Latin America.

      Schooling for Social Change offers fresh perspectives on the emerging field of human rights education in India. 60 years after independence, the Indian schooling system remains unequal. Building on over a year of fieldwork, including interviews and focus groups with policymakers, educators, parents and students, Monisha Bajaj examines different understandings of human rights education at the levels of policy, pedagogy and practice. She provides an in-depth study of the origins and effects of the Institute of Human Rights Education, a non-governmental program that operates in over 4,000 schools in India.

      This enlightening book offers an instructive case study of how international mandates and grassroots activism can work together.

      Bajaj shows how the Institute of Human Rights Education has gained significant momentum for school-based adoption, textbook reform, and policy changes in a nation-state still struggling to ensure universal access to education. Schooling for Social Change provides a wealth of analysis from the frontlines of education reform and will be of interest to all those working in international and comparative education, human rights, and South Asian development.

      Schools for the Future Europe brings together a team of leading academics, policy makers and education professionals to explore the emergence, development and application of European education policy up to the 2009 Lisbon Treaty and beyond. The book charts the historical development of a Europe-wide education policy, and examines how that policy has sought to address such issues as European citizenship, human rights and bilingual schooling. Taking as examples the intended future extension of the European Schools and the European Baccalaureate, and a case study of work towards the first British European Academy or Free School at Culham, UK, the book critically explores the interplay of EU action programmes, policy and rhetoric on secondary education. In the final section, the editors draw on the insights of the previous chapters to outline an achievable programme for the future development of education policy structures and practice in schools for Europe.

      Secondary English Teacher Education in the United States

      Author(s):

      Donna L. Pasternak, Samantha Caughlan, Heidi L. Hallman, Laura Renzi and Leslie S. Rush

      Identifying key areas of teacher education that cross countries and disciplines, this book provides the first extensive research-based insight into how secondary English teachers are prepared at institutions of higher education in the United States of America (US) since the last major study in 1995. In the two decades since then, English teacher education programs have developed in contextually dependent ways that often have been driven by institutional, economic, social, and political considerations

      The authors provide an overview of their nationwide study of English teacher educators, which was conducted over a four-year period. They analyze the context under which teacher educators currently prepare pre-service English teachers in the US and support teacher educators in other countries to make comparisons to their own unique historical and cultural settings

      The authors also offer a comprehensive evaluation of the content, practices, and skills being taught to future teachers of English in university-based teacher preparation programs in the US. The book draws on evidence from a nationwide questionnaire, case studies of teacher educators in their respective programs, course syllabi, and focus group interviews to focus on areas of instruction that resonate with teacher educators in countries where English is the dominant language of communication. These areas include:

      - field experiences

      - standards and assessment

      - teaching literacy to integrate reading and writing

      - working with English language learners to address cultural and linguistic diversity

      - new technologies in English education

      Service-Learning and Educating in Challenging Contexts explores the potential of service-learning identified as a way to integrate community service with academic study to enrich the on-going professional development of educators, especially in schools that are located in challenging contexts. This collection offers a further refinement of what typically comes under the remit of service-learning, switching the focus from the learning experience of the learner, to the educator and the deep and enriching professional learning opportunities that service-learning can offer. This approach to service-learning promotes collaborative practices amongst professional and in-service educators, and encourages an integration of theory and practice. The international contributors use their own experiences as well as current research to provide a thorough exploration of service-learning from national and international perspectives.

      Successful School Leadership

      International Perspectives

      Editor(s):

      Petros Pashiardis and Olof Johansson

      Successful School Leadership identifies the characteristics, behaviours and practices of successful and effective school leaders through the adoption of a systemic view of the quality of school organizations. Edited by Petros Pashiardis and Olof Johansson, chapters explore the similarities and differences between successful and effective school leaders and across various socioeconomic contexts. Capitalizing on the experiences of the international contributor team, this book will inform the preparation and further development provided to school leaders in an era where ministries of education, universities and multinational organisations (such as the OECD) are increasingly interested in the leadership of our schools.

      Systematic analyses of multi-perspective data provided from around the world and offers the readers a comprehensive picture of the key behaviours and practices central to successful and effective school leadership. An original contribution to the theoretical perspectives on the subject is derived through insights from empirical research, case studies, and bibliographical literature from the field.

      This book constitutes an exploration of the characteristics, behaviours and practices of successful and effective school leaders through the adoption of a systemic view of the quality of school organizations. Similarities and differences between successful and effective school leaders and across various socioeconomic contexts are also addressed. Moreover, an attempt is made to inform the preparation and further development provided to school leaders in an era where Ministries of Education, universities and multinational organisations are increasingly interested in the leadership of schools. It is argued that this interest did not come about by accident and it is certainly not ephemeral; it is the result of ample research worldwide during the last few decades, which indicates that school leadership is probably the single most important factor for excellence in schools, after teachers are taken into consideration. Systematic analyses of multi-perspective data provided by the various authors from around the world offer the readers a comprehensive picture of the key behaviours and practices central to successful and effective school leadership. This book encompasses an original contribution to the theoretical perspectives on successful and effective school leadership through insights derived from empirical research, case studies, and bibliographical literature from the field in a comparative and international perspective. Finally, an important aspect examined in this book is the combination of the idea of a successful and effective school leader with what constitutes successful and effective schools in the various parts of the world being examined.

      Capitalizing on the current movement in history education to nurture a set of shared methodologies and perspectives, this text looks to break down some of the obstacles to transnational understanding in history, focusing on pedagogy to embed democratic principles of inclusion, inquiry, multiple interpretations and freedom of expression.

      Four themes which are influencing the broadening of history education to a globalized community of practice run throughout Teaching History and the Changing Nation State:

      pedagogy, democracy and dialogue

      the nation – politics and transnational dimensions

      landmarks with questions

      shared histories, shared commemorations and re-evaluating past denials

      The contributors use the same pedagogical language in a global debate about history teaching and learning to break down barriers to search for shared histories and mutual understanding. They explore contemporary topics, including The Gallipoli Campaign in the WWI, transformative approaches to a school history curriculum and the nature of federation.

      State and Schools argues that the American educational model represents a third way of organizing the provision of schooling, and that this accounts for some of its strengths as well as some of its weaknesses. Charles L. Glenn looks closely at the tradition of democratic localism in the management of schooling, and the powerful and anti-democratic effect of the emerging education ‘profession,’ which has in some respects the characteristics of a religious movement more than of a true profession.

      A sweeping chronological survey, State and Schools includes chapters on the colonial background, schooling in the New Republic, the creation of an education profession, and the progressive education movement, among others. Glenn’s primary purpose, in this authoritative and thoroughly researched book, is to illustrate the deep roots of ways of thinking about schools that have made it difficult for policy-makers and the public to do what needs to be done to enable schools to function as they should, for our society and for future generations.

      Following on from the 50th anniversary of the birth of Theatre in Education in Britain in 2015, this is an essential and timely companion to the story of TIE. It contextualizes it within the political and educational landscape of the last fifty years and examines its legacy today. Through this, Roger Wooster offers insights into future possibilities and applications in the field of Applied Theatre, drama in schools and pedagogical theory. With examples and analysis of international developments in TIE, and a foreword by Philip Taylor (NYU, USA), the volume provides a wide-ranging account of past and current practice.

      Across its three sections the volume examines the origins, work and legacy of TIE, considering for the first time its practical details. Each section features an Afterword by a leading practitioner reflecting on the work (including Warwick Dobson, Chris Vine and Anthony Jackson), and chapters draw on case studies and interviews with key practitioners. Chapter summaries and a companion website further enhance the text as a valuable teaching resource for theatre educators.

      Over the past two hundred years German education policy and practice has attracted interest in England. Policy makers have used the ‘German example’ both to encourage change and development and to warn against certain courses of action. This monograph provides the first major analysis of the rich material from government reports (including work by Matthew Arnold), the press, travel accounts, memoirs, scholarly publications and the archives to uncover the nature of the English fascination with education in Germany, from 1800 to the end of the twentieth century. David Phillips traces this story and uses recent work in theories of educational policy ‘borrowing’ to analyze the reception of the German experience and its impact on the development of English education policy

      Forms of institutional governance critically shape the culture, creativity and academic outcomes of higher education. The book provides a new, updated and research based account of the changing face of the governance of British higher education. Historically, British universities were deemed amongst the most, if not the most, autonomous in Europe, with governance rooted in their collegial disciplinary structures. This assessment must now be decisively revised, although the belief systems deriving from it remain buried deep in university culture.

      Drawing on the authors' investigation of the governance of higher education in the four UK nations, including extensive on-site interviews, and discussions with government policy-makers, the book shows how global, national and system level pressures have changed the face both of the external governance of higher education institutions and how universities govern themselves. Government priorities, new funding methodologies and marketisation have all played a part in this process. Since the mid-1980s, there have been drastic changes in the external environment, reinforced by the increasing diversity within the higher education system as a whole and between the national sub-systems. In addition a new private sector of higher education has been created. New forms of institutional governance are emerging which may have profound effects on research and teaching and on academic creativity and innovation. The study discusses the effects of a state regulated system compared with the more heterarchical system which preceded it. It offers a comparison of the effects of devolved governance to Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on the respective higher education systems and their impact on institutional governance. The study concludes that England is becoming increasingly an outlier, and discusses the long term implications for the coherence of a British higher education system.

      This landmark collection explores the origins and foundations of music education in Europe, The Americas, Africa and Asia-Pacific, and the Middle East, and considers the inclusion of music as part of the compulsory school curriculum in the context of the historical, social and political landscape. Within each chapter, the contributors explore the following key areas:

      - the aims, objectives and content of the music curriculum

      - teaching methods

      - the provision and training of teachers of music

      - the experiences of pupils

      This fully revised second edition includes new chapters on Brazil, Israel, Kosovo, Lithuania, and Turkey, along with questions to encourage reflection and discussion. A concluding chapter has been added to encourage readers to consider the evolution of music education globally. The Foreword for this new edition has been written by Sheila Woodward, President of the International Society for Music Education.

      Contributors have been carefully selected to represent countries that have incorporated music into compulsory schooling for a variety of reasons resulting in a diverse collection which will guide future actions and policy.

      The Struggle for Teacher Education

      International Perspectives on Governance and Reforms

      Editor(s):

      Tom Are Trippestad, Anja Swennen and Tobias Werler

      Reform of teacher education is en vogue worldwide today due to the widespread belief that teacher education has the power to change traditional modes of schooling, educating new teachers who will be capable of improving the knowledge standard of children and boost the economic power of nations. The Struggle for Teacher Education brings together conceptual, comparative and empirical studies from Australia, England, Finland, The Netherlands, Norway, South Africa and South America to explore the ways in which professional education has been positioned in a reactive mode. The contributors discuss how teacher education is a contested division in higher education and look at how current reform efforts may limit the potential and work of teacher education, highlighting why this point needs more attention. Moreover, the collection reveals how teacher education’s authorship on teacher professionalism may be weakened or strengthened by current reform drives and offers alternative models on how to rethink reforming teacher education.

      Over the past few decades universities have opened their doors to students whose parents and grandparents were historically excluded from societal participation in higher education for reasons associated with racial, ethnic, socio-economic and/or linguistic diversity. Many of these students are first generation - or first in their family to attend university (FIFU). While some progress has been made in responding to the needs of these internationally underserved learners, many challenges remain.

      This edited book features the unique and diverse experiences of first generation students as they transition into and engage with higher education whilst exploring ways in which universities might better serve these students. With reference to culturally responsive and sustaining research methodologies undertaken in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, the UK and the USA, the contributors critically examine how these students demonstrate resilience within university, and ways in which success and challenges are articulated. Elements that are unique to context and shared across the international higher education milieu are explored. The book is replete with diverse student voices, and compelling implications for practice and future research

      The studies featured are centred on underlying theories of identity, intersectionality and barrier transcendence while valuing student voices and experiences. Throughout, the emphasis is on using strengths-based indigenous and decolonised methodologies. Through these culturally sustaining approaches, which include critical incident technique, participatory learning and action, talanoa and narrative inquiry, the book explores rich data on first generation student experiences at seven institutions in six countries across four continents

      During recent decades, social inequalities have increased in many urban spaces in the globalized world, and education has not been immune to these tendencies. Urban segregation, migration movements and education policies themselves have produced an increasing process of school segregation between the most disadvantaged social groups and the middle classes.

      Exploring school segregation patterns in Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, England, France, Peru, Spain, Sweden and the USA, this volume provides an overview of the main characteristics and causes of school segregation, as well as its consequences for issues such as education inequalities, students’ performance, social cohesion and intercultural contact.

      The book is organized in three parts, with Part 1 exploring the systemic dimensions of education inequalities that shape different patterns of school segregation, and the extent to which public policies have addressed this challenge. Part 2 focuses on the consequences of school segregation on student performance and other educational aspects, and Part 3 explores how school segregation dynamics are shaped by market forces and privatization of education. Whilst focusing on different dimensions of school segregation, each chapter explores the magnitude, trends and consequences of school segregation, providing readers with a comprehensive overview of the phenomenon and facilitating cross-country comparisons. Moreover, the volume provides important evidence about the dynamics and characteristics of school segregation, which is key for the planning and implementation of de-segregation policies.